A Comparison of U.S. and Canadian Hockey Media

By Ben Barr and Cate Kinlein

Introduction

Hockey’s place in the sports media hierarchy in the United States and Canada has been historically different. Hockey is widely considered Canada’s sport, in both origin and popularity. Although 23 of the 30 teams in the National Hockey League are located in the United States, it’s been understood that the most powerful media microscopes are located north of the border.

This can be attributed to a number of factors. We used multiple comparisons among different types of media outlets to learn more about these differences and why they occur. In offline mediums, space is at a premium and hockey’s popularity in different markets compared to other sports can dictate how much hockey coverage viewers see. This makes sense with page space in a newspaper or magazine or airtime in a show. Hockey’s grassroots popularity in a market also has proven to have a great effect on its sports media standing (aside from markets that do not focus on sports media as much because their resources to cover non-sports news are limited).

Hockey media coverage spans across many different mediums that are employed by news organizations today. Traditional print publications (whether newspapers or magazines) have used non-print avenues to extend their reach, whether through their own websites or social media pages. This can be attributed to the continuing change of the journalism industry and the need to report news faster. Even major newspapers that are read far away from their own cities or The Hockey News (which had 88,577 subscriptions as of Dec. 31, according to the Alliance for Audited Media) capitalize on the Internet to increase their media reach even further.

Ultimately, newspapers and magazines have been forced to keep up with the faster online news cycle the Internet provides. Frank Brown, the vice president of the NHL, explains: “the industry has changed so the coverage is bound to change. The newspapers used to dictate the news cycle, and now the newspapers are by nature behind.”

Media outlets covering hockey are not exempt from this. There are many events in the NHL league year and other levels of hockey that require fast and updated reporting, for example,NHL free agency and trades as well as the selections of international teams. With online journalism, there is no limit to who can have a space to instantly report online.


Print Media

Newspapers in the U.S. and Canada still cover hockey in their print editions, but we found disparities between the amounts of coverage in the two countries that were often reflected by hockey’s presence in different areas. This led us to confirm more confidently that hockey has a more comprehensive media reach in Canada, but that’s not to say that the focus on hockey in Canadian newspapers is always at the top of certain sports pages. For example, despite being less than 20 miles from Toronto, The Mississauga News did not have an overwhelming focus on the Maple Leafs in their sports coverage.

This is surprising, considering the Toronto area is often thought to have the most powerful media microscope focusing on the Maple Leafs and hockey in general. The team’s tradition — as well as its tough media — has drawn comparisons to New York’s sports landscape. While media scrutiny can sometimes be a deterrent for players to sign somewhere or perform well, others embrace it. Maple Leafs forward James Van Riemsdyk was traded from Philadelphia (a city known for its own tough media) to the Maple Leafs and expressed excitement in a conference call with Toronto media after the move, saying, “Tthe tradition they have there, the city, the fans, it’s all unbelievable. Growing up a big- time Yankees fan, it’s kind of like playing for the New York Yankees of the NHL. I’m definitely looking forward to getting everything going.”

But we were surprised to find that this reputation apparently didn’t include Mississauga — at least to the same extent. When we researched newspaper archive coverage by playoff round for the 2013 Stanley Cup Playoffs, the Mississauga News posted five, four, zero, and one article, respectively. Granted,the Maple Leafs were eliminated in the first round by the Boston Bruins after blowing a three-goal lead in the decisive Game Seven, so it’s fair to expect a little less coverage with them out. At the same time, it was surprising to learn how little the publication covered the playoffs in general, considering its location.Though the Maple Leafs were knocked out in the first round, they lost in heartbreaking fashion, and their opponent went on to the Stanley Cup Finals.It would seem to make sense to refer back to the series loss with a “what could’ve been” narrative for the local team. That idea was discussed in other Canadian newspapers regarding their respective teams. In fact, the only major American newspaper that we researched that covered the playoffs less was The Miami Herald, which completely used wire articles and no reporters to cover the entire playoffs. This can be attributed to a number of reasons, including that the Florida area is not a traditional hockey market, the Florida Panthers missing the Stanley Cup playoffs as well as having some of the lowest attendance numbers in the league, and the many other sports options from which fans can choose the 2011-12 and 2012-13 NBA champion Heat , the Dolphins, the Marlins, and the Hurricanes). Capitals Radio Network host Ben Raby shares this sports landscape perspective, saying, “There really isn’t a whole lot else as far as alternative sports options [in Canada] to the extent they’re available in the U.S. … Toronto’s the only [city] up there that has a Major League Baseball team, NBA, and that’s it. Other cities have some CFL teams but if you’re talking about the four major sports leagues, the NHL is the only one that’s obviously readily served and readily available in Canada.”

The Mississauga News comparing closely with The Miami Herald in hockey coverage was one of a few surprising takeaways from our American and Canadian newspaper research. Other major American newspapers we considered were The New York Times, Washington Post, Detroit Free Press, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, and The Chicago Tribune. We considered how each paper covered their local NHL teams compared to others around the league, how their coverage was affected after their local teams were eliminated, where hockey stories showed up in sports sections, and each collective sports market to see if the number of sports options in area could positively or negatively affect the amount of coverage and publicity hockey had in each area.


US Newspapers

New York Times:- New York Rangers, New York Islanders, New Jersey Devils

Local NHL Scene:-
The Rangers were covered the most of the three NHL teams we considered local to The New York Times. The Times features stories from around the NHL too, but the Devils do not have the same focus as the Rangers and Islanders do. Brown thinks “the coverage is extremely market-centric [in the U.S.]. So even if the Rangers win let’s say, 6-3 and all three goals are scored by the same player on the opposing team, that player may not even be mentioned in a game story.”

Sports Market:-
New York is a very crowded sports market. Along with the Rangers, Islanders, and Devils, New York is home to MLB’s Yankees and Mets, the NBA’s Knicks and Nets, and the NFL’s Jets and Giants. As a result, hockey coverage is located near the bottom of The Times’ sports web pages alongside the likes of skiiing, the Nets, and a Boston Marathon security update, for example. The Times’ online sports page features listed stories with photos before the bottom of the page, which only features linked headlines without photos. Hockey is often found right above these lower,stories unaccompanied by photos.

2013 Stanley Cup Playoffs:-
The Rangers lost to the Bruins in the second round, while the Islanders fell to the Penguins in the first round. The Devils missed the playoffs altogether. The only large dip in playoff coverage came during the Eastern Conference Finals between the Bruins and Penguins. The Times had many archived stories during the Stanley Cup Finals.


Washington Post:- Washington Capitals

Local NHL Scene:-
The Post’s local NHL team is the Washington Capitals. The newspaper has a heavy local online focus without any quick way to find around the league stories and scores, considering that newspapers will typically list box scores online if they don’t have any around- the- league stories. Steve Whyno, who used to cover the Capitals for The Washington Times before becoming an NHL reporter for the Canadian Press,sees the Brown’s “market-centric” U.S. hockey media landscape fueled by American sports fans too, calling it “a certain tunnel vision among fans and it may not even [be] just hockey, this may be an American thing that you want to hear and read everything about your team and get every bit of minutia about your team.”


Sports Market:-
The Post is in the middle of the DMV sports market. This concentrates media attention for on sports teams located in Baltimore as well as Washington.In addition to the Capitals, the area features the NFL’s Redskins and Ravens, the NBA’s Wizards, the MLB’s Nationals and Orioles and D.C. United of MLS,. as well as many NCAA programs. The Capitals coverage can be found alongside the Nationals, but The Post focuses a lot on the Redskins when they are in season. Even during the Redskins’ offseason, Capitals game stories do not always get top billing. For example, a Bryce Harper spring training update was given a higher position on The Post web site over a Capitals game story.


2013 Stanley Cup Playoffs:-
The Capitals lost to the Rangers in the first round in a seven-game series. Following suit with The Post’s heavy local focus, the number of archived Capitals stories took a sharp drop after the team was eliminated.


Chicago Tribune:- Chicago Blackhawks


Local NHL Scene:-
The Chicago Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup in 2010 and 2013, becoming the first team to win two Stanley Cups after the 2004-05 NHL lockout. The Tribune’s hockey coverage is very Blackhawks heavy, without many around-the-league stories.


Sports Market:-
Chicago is home to the NFL’s Bears, the MLB’s Cubs and White Sox, the NBA’s Bulls,and NCAA programs such as DePaul and Northwestern. The Blackhawks aren’t usually featured alongside NFL and MLB coverage, but after the top stories, online team sections are listed alphabetically, so it is impossible to define the Blackhawks’ standing in Chicago sports attention based on page placement.


2013 Stanley Cup Playoffs: -
The Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup in 2013 after defeating the Minnesota Wild, Detroit Red Wings, Los Angeles Kings, and Boston Bruins in the playoffs. Archive numbers were impressive throughout, and they exploded during the Stanley Cup Finals.


Detroit Free Press: - Detroit Red Wings


Local NHL Scene:-
The Red Wings are considered one of the NHL’s model franchises as well as one of the Original Six that the league began with (along with the Blackhawks, Bruins, Rangers, Canadiens, and Maple Leafs). The Free Press’s hockey coverage has a dominant focus on the Red Wings, but there is a good bit of around- the- league coverage. A lot of the non-Red Wings NHL coverage comes back to focus on potential impacts on the Red Wings.


Sports Market:-
Detroit is home to the NFL’s Lions, the NBA’s Pistons, and the MLB’s Tigers. The Red Wings share space in the Free Press alongside NFL and college basketball coverage in the wintertime, but its current game stories can be overshadowed by offseason news in the NFL and college basketball.


2013 Stanley Cup Playoffs:-
The Red Wings lost to the Blackhawks in the second round after blowing a 3-1 series lead to fall in seven games. The series was between two historic rivals in their last playoff matchup before the Red Wings moved to the Eastern Conference beginning for the 2013-14 season. By the time the Stanley Cup playoffs began in the springtime, archive numbers were very low. Whyno sees this as a product of varying U.S. markets and media resources, explaining that “in the United States, it feels like a lot of markets shrug their shoulders and say, ‘All right, my season’s done’ and the focus turns to the draft and turns to free agency rather than keeping an eye and spending money, really, for media agencies, spending money to send a reporter to a Cup Final.”


Los Angeles Times:- Los Angeles Kings, Anaheim Ducks, San Jose Sharks


Local NHL Scene:-
California is home to three NHL teams, the Kings, Ducks, and Sharks. The Times identifies the Kings as its local team, with the Ducks coming in second in regard to coverage focus. Visiting The Times website will show a Kings tab along with an NHL/Ducks tab, but the Sharks are not individually recognized, considering they are 340 miles north of Los Angeles in San Jose. Despite the non-traditional hockey climate, around- the- league coverage online is robust.


Sports Market:-
Los Angeles is another crowded American sports market. It’s home to the NBA’s Lakers and Clippers as well as the MLB’s Dodgers and Angels, plus prominent college programs such as USC and UCLA. They haven’t had an NFL franchise since the Raiders left for Oakland after the 1994 season.


2013 Stanley Cup Playoffs:-
The Kings advanced the furthest of all the Californian teams, losing to the eventual -champion Blackhawks in the third round. The Kings beat the Sharks in the second round, and the Ducks fell to the Red Wings in the first round after winning the Pacific Division during the regular season. Archive numbers were fairly consistent throughout the playoffs.


Boston Globe:- Boston Bruins


Local NHL Scene:-
The Bruins returned to the Stanley Cup Final in 2013 after winning the Cup in 2011. They are often considered a front-runners in the Eastern Conference. Within The Globe’s online NHL section, coverage is good, but it does not have a high standing overall.


Sports Market:-
Boston is home to many renowned teams, and the city’s professional sports teams generate a national following. This includes the MLB’s Red Sox, the NFL’s Patriots, and the NBA’s Celtics. Prominent college programs include Boston College and Boston University.Bruins coverage often falls behind these teams. While Raby discussed Canada’s limited sports alternatives, Whyno sees the opposite in the U.S. and how that has affected hockey coverage. He sees “hockey as the fourth sport here. There are few places in the United States where it’s No. one 1 or No. two 2 in fan interest. It would be hard to say whether hockey media is going to improve drastically or become any bigger unless that changes.”


2013 Stanley Cup Playoffs:-
The Bruins fell to the Blackhawks in a Stanley Cup Final between two members of the Original Six. However, coverage at the Globe was sparse.


Miami Herald:- Florida Panthers


Local NHL Scene:- The Herald’s small, local NHL focus is on the Panthers. Wire articles that any newspaper could use support a lot of the Herald’s around- the- league coverage. They do have a beat reporting staff for the Panthers, but those articles as well as anything related to hockey gets buried under a lot of other sports.


Sports Market:- The Miami area’s climate isn’t conducive to hockey, and the city features other, more popular sports teams. The NBA’s Heat are two-time NBA champions and have popular players such as LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and Chris Bosh.Miami also hosts the NFL’s Dolphins, the MLB’s Marlins, and University of Miami.


2013 Stanley Cup Playoffs:- The Panthers missed the playoffs, and The Herald’s playoff coverage was completely supported by wire services. This can be attributed to a number of alternative sports and limited resources to cover a sport that isn’t particularly popular in Florida. According to Brown, “a lot of markets are so focused on their teams and budgets are being cut so profoundly as the industry evolves [that] there are a lot of instances where and it’s not just because of hockey —) once the local aspect is out of the picture, the papers will use wire service copy or they’ll sort of [have] cooperative situations where newspapers will combine their staffs and sort of use the coverage in a number of papers as opposed to just one.”


Canadian Newspapers

Toronto Star:- Toronto Maple Leafs

Local NHL Scene:-
Toronto has a number of sports teams, but we found much of the focus to be on the Maple Leafs. The Leafs are the city’s only NHL team, The Star has beat writers assigned to cover the team.


Sports Market:-
The Leafs are not the only professional team in Toronto,there are also teams from the MLB, NBA, MLS, MLL and CFL. A number of minor league teams also compete for coverage in the oversaturated sports market.


2013 Playoffs:-
Toronto made the playoffs, and so there was a glut of coverage while the Leafs were in it. There were 30 articles regarding the Leafs in the days preceding the first round. There were 19 articles published during the playoffs about various things in the NHL, unrelated to the playoffs. Many of the playoff articles published in later rounds had a distinct Leafs spin, like “what went wrong” or “if the Leafs made it this far.”


Mississauga News:- Toronto Maple Leafs


Local NHL Scene:-
Mississauga is a suburb of Toronto, located within 20 miles of the city. The Maple Leafs are often subject to a lot of media scrutiny, but the numbers from The Mississauga News indicate that not much of that perceived scrutiny came from that paper. Maple Leafs and around- the- league coverage aren’t very prominent online, and The News has its own section for the Mississauga Steelheads,the city’s junior team that plays in the Ontario Hockey League.


Sports Market:-
Mississauga has the Steelheads as well as an NBL basketball team called the Power. The closest major pro sports market is Toronto, which has the NHL’s Maple Leafs, the NBA’s Raptors, and the MLB’s Blue Jays. The Mississauga News is an outlet that unexpectedly goes against the traditional expectations of how Canadian publications cover hockey and goes against Philadelphia Flyers play-by-play broadcaster Jim Jackson’s idea that “The hockey team is king in Canada, whereas in the U.S. it’s just part of the sports mix of the four majors and even some of the other sports now. Soccer [is] making inroads. [There’s] more options in the US and in Canada hockey is clearly No. 1.”


2013 Stanley Cup Playoffs:-
The Maple Leafs fell to the Bruins in the first round after blowing a three-goal lead in the third period of Game Seven. However, this heartbreaking loss and the Bruins’ eventual run to the Stanley Cup Finals did not encourage The News to cover much of the Stanley Cup playoffs at all.


Montreal Gazette:- Montreal Canadiens


Local NHL Scene:-
The Montreal Canadiens are the best-known team in the area, and have a beat writer assigned to the team during the season.


Sports Market:-
The Canadiens are the main team, but Montreal plays host to a CFL team as well as an MLS team. There are a number of minor league teams in the general area that compete with the professional teams for coverage.


2013 Playoffs:-
Stereotypically, Canada is considered “better” at hockey coverage, and many of the experts we spoke to agreed with that point.However, The Gazette did not continue to provide staff coverage or NHL coverage after the Canadiens lost in the playoffs. During the playoffs, The Montreal Gazette published a total of 18 playoff articles, with the most articles during the Stanley Cup round.


Calgary Herald:- Calgary Flames


Local NHL Scene:-
The Flames are the only professional hockey team in the area. Most articles on The Herald’s website were taken from wire sevices.


Sports Market:-
There is also a CFL team and a MLL team in addition to the Flames. There are a number of minor league teams in a variety of sports throughout the Alberta region;, however, The Herald focuses on those close to Calgary.


2013 Playoffs:-
The Calgary Herald published the most articles in the first round of the playoffs, covering all of the matchups. Several articles pertained to the Flames’ season and what rebuilding the team would look like. As the playoffs progressed, some of the articles followed long-time Flames star Jarome Iginla as his new team, the Penguins, made it from round to round. A number of articles published in the first and second rounds were focused on contract extensions, firings and hirings and speculations about the next season. Nearly all of the articles were from the Associated Press, or some other wire service.


Edmonton Journal:- Edmonton Oilers

Local NHL Scene:- During the season, The Journal assigns a beat reporter to the Oilers, with continued reports during the playoffs despite the Oilers not making the postseason.


Sports Market:- The Oilers are one of five professional teams in Edmonton, competing with teams from the CFL, International Basketball League, Indoor Lacrosse, and the North American Soccer League.


2013 Playoffs:- The Edmonton Journal was fairly consistent in its coverage throughout the playoffs. There was a large drop between the first and second rounds (as Edmonton didn’t make the playoffs), but coverage stayed fairly consistent after that. A number of the articles published in the third round and the Finals were about dealings around the NHL. Several others had the flavor of “what the Oilers could learn from the Blackhawks.” Many of the articles were actually written by staff reporters and not taken from the wire.


Vancouver Sun:- Vancouver Canucks


Local NHL Scene:-
The Sun eventually drew on wire stories once the Canucks were eliminated;, however, up to that point the articles were mostly written by a beat reporter.

Sports Market:-
Vancouver hosts an MLS, a Single-A baseball team and a CFL team in addition to the Canucks. The Canucks mostly compete with the CFL team for coverage.

2013 Playoffs:-
The Canucks made it to the playoffs, and therefore most (if not all) of the coverage was about them for the first round. The Sharks swept them, and while coverage of the playoffs eventually faded to only four articles during the Stanley Cup Finals, there were still articles being published about the Canucks (what they were doing, contracts, disappointing series, etc.)


Ottawa Citizen:- Ottawa Senators

Local NHL Scene: -The Citizen didn’t publish nearly the number of articles expected from a team that made the playoffs. More surprisingly, some of the articles came from the wire, not just beat writers.


Sports Market: - The NHL, the NBL, and the CFL all have professional teams in Ottawa, in addition to a number of minor league teams.


2013 Playoffs:- Though the Senators made it to the playoffs and weren’t eliminated until the second round, there weren’t many articles published. Only eight were published in the first round, and 15 in the second round. This is contrary to what we’ve seen with other Canadian newspapers that have a team that makes the playoffs, for example, both Toronto and Vancouver.



Television and Media

Hockey fans don’t go to ESPN for hockey coverage, because they have been trained to know they’re not going to get much. ESPN held the broadcasting rights from 1992-2004, but gave them up during the 2004-2005 lockout, in favor of Major League Baseball.

After the 2004-05 lockout, the NHL signed a deal with the fledgling OLN (rebranded as Versus in 2006), which then became a part of the NBC Sports Group, once Comcast purchased NBC Universal. The channel was rebranded again as NBC Sports Network in 2012. Patience and (mostly) luck, then led the NHL to a $2 billion deal over 10 years, broadcasting more national games, specialty games (such as the Winter Classic) and more rounds of the playoffs than ESPN ever did.

As the NBC Sports Network grows, the NHL finds itself the network’s No. 1 one sport,; not having to compete with the NFL or the NBA for coverage. NBC’s coverage of hockey is giving the league the coverage it needs to grow and re-establish a fan base after the lockout. Jackson says that “NBC has done a great job with it and the NHL Network has really helped. I think more and more people are watching TV on a specialized basis.They turn on a TV to find a specific station for their interests. So hockey fans now can go to the NHL Network, go to NBC Sports Network, go to NBC when their coverage kicks up and they can follow hockey and really get the kind of hockey coverage they want, whereas that wasn’t necessarily the case as recently as five or six years ago.”

After re-upping on more short-term deals, NBC and the NHL agreed on an extension through the 2020-21 season worth nearly $2 billion in April 2011. NBC has been instrumental in this growth by broadcasting events such as the Winter Classic beginning in 2008 and the Stadium Series during the 2013-14 season. As time has gone on the network also has expanded the number of broadcasts and brands on its NBC Sports Network to include nationally -televised games from Sunday to Wednesday, including highlighting “Wednesday Night Rivalry” games. NBC’s expansion has also included making sure that all hockey fans can see every Stanley Cup playoff game. This led to the company broadcasting games on its financial channel, CNBC. Sporting events rarely air on CNBC outside of the Olympics. NBC has been commended for its presentation when broadcasting hockey in a country where it is lower on the sports popularity totem pole.

Canadian hockey television rights will transition from TSN to Rogers beginning with the 2014-15 season. Even with hockey being the most popular sport in Canada, this new deal has been applauded for the growth it will still give the league. The deal runs until the 2025-26 season and is worth $5.2 billion Canadian dollars. This is slated to raise the league’s salary cap. Owners will have more money to spend to improve their rosters, which should lead to players getting bigger contracts in free agency. Unlike the NFL, where games are distributed over multiple networks by the league, Rogers will be able to choose which games air on CBC (who will still broadcast Hockey Night in Canada) and French-language channel TVA. The biggest change coming from this is that TSN will only air regional coverage under the Rogers deal.

Raby thinks the comprehensive Canadian hockey media needs to continue to find good stories to supplement its large presence to be successful, saying “Whether it’s print or TV at the end of the day you still need good stories. You need good stories, you need good storytelling and if you’re north of the border where there is so much coverage, sometimes it helps to find the secondary or third story [to find] something that’s not what everyone else is doing. Find the outside stories and tell those stories in an interesting way.”

While ESPN does not devote airtime to live NHL action,it does boast an NHL section on their its website. Listed behind the NFL, the MLB and the NBA (in that order), hockey is buried under the amount of coverage that the three major pro sports, and even college sports receive. To find any coverage of the NHL, one must deliberately navigate to that part of the website. The coverage on ESPN is average. It does not have the depth that The Hockey News has, or NHL.com or even a number of hockey blogs, but it is adequate coverage for the casual fan.

In terms of online coverage, it is hard to say that one country surpasses the other. The Internet today, is so broad and inclusive; that fans everywhere can get the information they want and need for every team. With the number of blogs available, as well as players’ Twitter and Instagram accounts and Facebook pages, it is easy for fans to get every bit of minutiae.

When it comes to big network coverage online, for example, TSN versus ESPN or NBC Sports, TSN has a much stronger presence. As stated before, ESPN hides its hockey coverage, and while NBC holds the broadcasting rights to the NHL in the United States, the website does not prominently feature hockey in the way that TSN does. When visiting TSN.com, it is hard to find anything on the homepage that is not hockey-related, and coverage is centered on the Canadian teams.


Conclusion

We found that geographical fan bases as well as the resources that media outlets are able to devote to covering the sport as the season goes on affect hockey media coverage. Newspapers that we researched showed how coverage hinges on local teams staying alive in the playoffs, with article numbers dropping when their home teams are eliminated. Canadian newspaper article numbers showed this drop off even though hockey is considered the most popular sport (some newspapers with non-playoff teams in their markets,such as those in Calgary and Edmonton even registered higher than Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, and Montreal). Also, newspapers based in non-traditional hockey markets such as The Miami Herald relied on wire services for its coverage of the 2013 Stanley Cup playoffs.

When we decided to look into a smaller Canadian outlet such as the Mississauga News, we saw the same regression as its closest NHL team (the Toronto Maple Leafs) was eliminated, and their its smaller article output can reflect lesser coverage resources. This is a point that Steve Whyno brought up as a media member who has covered hockey in both the U.S. and Canada. We believe that hockey media coverage is going to continue to move forward with more of a non-print presence considering these figures as well as expanded TV deals in both the U.S. and Canada and with video coverage transitioning more and more to online bonus content on multiple devices. Newspapers have enhanced their online presence as developments like this have continued in the media industry. Multi-device media consumption is growing in many kinds of news media, and hockey media is no different in either country. While we believe that Canada has the deeper hockey following and media coverage than the U.S. based on our content research and interviews, both countries’ media outlets are progressing into the future in similar ways with more focus on non-print media.


U.S. Newspaper Articles Per 2013 Stanley Cup Playoff Round

New York Times:- New York Rangers, New York Islanders, New Jersey Devils

1st Round 79(Devils miss playoffs, Islanders lose to Penguins)
2nd Round 63 (Rangers lose to Bruins)
3rd Round 23
Stanley Cup Final 92
Total 257


Washington Post:- Washington Capitals

1st Round 46(Capitals lose to Rangers)
2nd Round 14
3rd Round 2
Stanley Cup Final 3
Total 65

Chicago Tribune:- Chicago Blackhawks

1st Round 53
2nd Round 33
3rd Round 52
Stanley Cup Final 271 (Blackhawks win the Stanley Cup)
Total 513

Detroit Free Press:- Detroit Red Wings

1st Round 4
2nd Round 7 (Red Wings lose to Blackhawks)
3rd Round 3
Stanley Cup Final 1
Total 15

Los Angeles Times:- Los Angeles Kings, Anaheim Ducks, San Jose Sharks

1st Round 28(Ducks lose to Red Wings)
2nd Round 44(Sharks lose to Kings)
3rd Round 35(Kings lose to Blackhawks)
Stanley Cup Final 33
Total 140

Boston Globe:- Boston Bruins

1st Round 7
2nd Round 18
3rd Round 10
Stanley Cup Final 9(Bruins lose to Blackhawks)
Total 44

Miami Herald:- Florida Panthers

1st Round 0 (Panthers miss playoffs, used wire)
2nd Round 0 (used wire)
3rd Round 0 (used wire)
Stanley Cup Final 0 (used wire)
Total 0


Canadian Newspaper Articles Per 2013 Stanley Cup Playoff Round

Toronto Star:- Toronto Maple Leafs

1st Round 22 (Maple Leafs lose to Bruins, only 3 not about the Maple Leafs)
2nd Round 7
3rd Round 7
Stanley Cup Final 14
Total 50


Mississauga News:- Toronto Maple Leafs

1st Round 5 (Maple Leafs lose to Bruins)
2nd Round 4
3rd Round 0
Stanley Cup Final 1
Total 10

Montreal Gazette:- Montreal Canadiens

1st Round 2 (Canadiens lose to Senators)
2nd Round 0
3rd Round 3
Stanley Cup Final 13
Total 18

Calgary Herald:- Calgary Flames

1st Round 64 (Flames miss playoffs, some articles about the Flames)
2nd Round 58
3rd Round 24
Stanley Cup Final 16
Total 162

Edmonton Journal:- Edmonton Oilers

1st Round 47 (some articles about Oilers missing playoffs)
2nd Round 19
3rd Round 19
Stanley Cup Final 15
Total 100

Vancouver Sun:- Vancouver Canucks

1st Round 30 (Canucks lose to Sharks, nearly all articles are about the Canucks)
2nd Round 15 (nearly half the articles about Canucks disappointing series against the Sharks)
3rd Round 7
Stanley Cup Final 4
Total 56

Ottawa Citizen:- Ottawa Senators

1st Round 8
2nd Round 15 (Senators lose to Penguins)
3rd Round 4
Stanley Cup Final 0
Total 27